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021918ColoKennelClubDogShowMP0491

SHOT 2/19/18 5:25:21 PM - Tanner, a 13 year-old male Vizsla, plays in the snow during a winter storm in Denver, Co. The Vizsla is a dog breed originating in Hungary, which belongs under the FCI group 7 (Pointer group). The Hungarian or Magyar Vizsla are sporting dogs and loyal companions, in addition to being the smallest of the all-round pointer-retriever breeds. The Vizsla's medium size is one of the breed's most appealing characteristics as a hunter of fowl and upland game, and through the centuries the Vizsla has held a rare position among sporting dogs – that of household companion and family dog. The Vizsla is a natural hunter endowed with an excellent nose and an outstanding trainability. It was bred to work in field, forest, or water. Although they are lively, gentle-mannered, demonstrably affectionate and sensitive, they are also fearless and possessed of a well-developed protective instinct. (Photo by Marc Piscotty / © 2018)

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© 2018 Marc Piscotty
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Tanner
SHOT 2/19/18 5:25:21 PM - Tanner, a 13 year-old male Vizsla, plays in the snow during a winter storm in Denver, Co. The Vizsla is a dog breed originating in Hungary, which belongs under the FCI group 7 (Pointer group). The Hungarian or Magyar Vizsla are sporting dogs and loyal companions, in addition to being the smallest of the all-round pointer-retriever breeds. The Vizsla's medium size is one of the breed's most appealing characteristics as a hunter of fowl and upland game, and through the centuries the Vizsla has held a rare position among sporting dogs – that of household companion and family dog. The Vizsla is a natural hunter endowed with an excellent nose and an outstanding trainability. It was bred to work in field, forest, or water. Although they are lively, gentle-mannered, demonstrably affectionate and sensitive, they are also fearless and possessed of a well-developed protective instinct. (Photo by Marc Piscotty / © 2018)