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RMNSnowFeaEmpireMP226

SHOT 10/2/2002 - Aspen leaves gather droplets of water as the early-season snow begins to melt near Empire along Highway 40 Wednesday morning. Aspens are trees of the willow family and comprise a section of the poplar genus, Populus sect. Populus. Aspens (apart from the aberrant White Poplar) are distinguished by their nearly round leaves on mature trees, 9?16 cm diameter with irregular rounded teeth. They are carried on strongly flattened leaf stems, which enable the leaves to twist and flutter in the slightest of breezes. All the aspens (including White Poplar) typically grow in large colonies derived from a single seedling, and spreading by means of root suckers; new stems in the colony may appear at up to 30?40 m from the parent tree. Each tree only lives for 40?150 years above ground, but the root system of the colony is long-lived, in some cases for many thousands of years, sending up new trunks as the older trunks die off above ground. For this reason it is considered to be an indicator of ancient woodlands..(Photo by Marc Piscotty / © 2002)

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Filename
MAPSnowFeaEmpireMP1.jpg
Copyright
© 2006 Marc Piscotty
Image Size
1800x1181 / 927.0KB
Contained in galleries
Fall in Colorado, Winter Scenics, Colorado Tourism
SHOT 10/2/2002 - Aspen leaves gather droplets of water as the early-season snow begins to melt near Empire along Highway 40 Wednesday morning. Aspens are trees of the willow family and comprise a section of the poplar genus, Populus sect. Populus. Aspens (apart from the aberrant White Poplar) are distinguished by their nearly round leaves on mature trees, 9?16 cm diameter with irregular rounded teeth. They are carried on strongly flattened leaf stems, which enable the leaves to twist and flutter in the slightest of breezes. All the aspens (including White Poplar) typically grow in large colonies derived from a single seedling, and spreading by means of root suckers; new stems in the colony may appear at up to 30?40 m from the parent tree. Each tree only lives for 40?150 years above ground, but the root system of the colony is long-lived, in some cases for many thousands of years, sending up new trunks as the older trunks die off above ground. For this reason it is considered to be an indicator of ancient woodlands..(Photo by Marc Piscotty / © 2002)