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121110FrascaFoodWineFamilyMealMP0692

SHOT 12/11/10 5:56:30 PM - Poli grappa at Frasca Food and Wine in the Boulder, Co. restaurant. Frasca is a highly-rated neighborhood restaurant inspired by the cuisine and culture of Friuli, Italy. Historically found throughout Friuli, Frascas were friendly and informal gathering places, a destination for farmers, friends, and families to share a meal and a bottle of wine. Identified by a tree branch hanging over a doorway portal, they were a symbol of local farm cuisine, wine, and warm hospitality. Grappa is an alcoholic beverage, a fragrant grape-based pomace brandy of between 35% and 60% alcohol by volume (70 to 120 US proof) of Italian origin. Literally "grape stalk", most grappa is made by distilling pomace and grape residue (mainly the skins, but also stems and seeds) left over from winemaking after pressing. It was originally made to prevent waste by using leftovers at the end of the wine season. (Photo by Marc Piscotty / © 2010)

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121110FrascaFoodWineFamilyMealMP0692.jpg
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© 2010 Marc Piscotty
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Travel & Leisure Boulder Request, Frasca Food and Wine
SHOT 12/11/10 5:56:30 PM - Poli grappa at Frasca Food and Wine in the Boulder, Co. restaurant.  Frasca is a highly-rated neighborhood restaurant inspired by the cuisine and culture of Friuli, Italy. Historically found throughout Friuli, Frascas were friendly and informal gathering places, a destination for farmers, friends, and families to share a meal and a bottle of wine. Identified by a tree branch hanging over a doorway portal, they were a symbol of local farm cuisine, wine, and warm hospitality. Grappa is an alcoholic beverage, a fragrant grape-based pomace brandy of between 35% and 60% alcohol by volume (70 to 120 US proof) of Italian origin. Literally "grape stalk", most grappa is made by distilling pomace and grape residue (mainly the skins, but also stems and seeds) left over from winemaking after pressing. It was originally made to prevent waste by using leftovers at the end of the wine season. (Photo by Marc Piscotty / © 2010)