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071611DurangoCoCampingMP0082

SHOT 7/12/11 7:38:36 AM - An Historic Public Building plaque on a building in Ouray, Co. Originally established by miners chasing silver and gold in the surrounding mountains, the town at one time boasted more horses and mules than people. Prospectors arrived in the area in 1875. At the height of the mining, Ouray had more than 30 active mines. The town--after changing its name and that of the county it was in several times--was incorporated on October 2, 1876, named after Chief Ouray of the Utes, a Native American tribe. By 1877 Ouray had grown to over 1,000 in population and was named county seat of the newly formed Ouray County on March 8, 1877.The San Juan Mountains are a high and rugged mountain range in the Rocky Mountains in southwestern Colorado. The area is highly mineralized (the Colorado Mineral Belt) and figured in the gold and silver mining industry of early Colorado. The San Juan and Uncompahgre National Forests cover a large portion of the San Juan Mountains. (Photo by Marc Piscotty / © 2011)

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071611DurangoCoCampingMP0082.JPG
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© 2011 Marc Piscotty
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Contained in galleries
Encompass Colorado Scenic Drives
SHOT 7/12/11 7:38:36 AM - An Historic Public Building plaque on a building in Ouray, Co. Originally established by miners chasing silver and gold in the surrounding mountains, the town at one time boasted more horses and mules than people. Prospectors arrived in the area in 1875. At the height of the mining, Ouray had more than 30 active mines. The town--after changing its name and that of the county it was in several times--was incorporated on October 2, 1876, named after Chief Ouray of the Utes, a Native American tribe. By 1877 Ouray had grown to over 1,000 in population and was named county seat of the newly formed Ouray County on March 8, 1877.The San Juan Mountains are a high and rugged mountain range in the Rocky Mountains in southwestern Colorado. The area is highly mineralized (the Colorado Mineral Belt) and figured in the gold and silver mining industry of early Colorado. The San Juan and Uncompahgre National Forests cover a large portion of the San Juan Mountains. (Photo by Marc Piscotty / © 2011)