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011510SayulitaMexicoTripMP1458

SHOT 1/18/10 5:56:14 PM - A yellow-crowned night heron hunts for food along the shore in Sayulita, Mexico. The Yellow-crowned Night Heron (Nyctanassa violacea, formerly placed in the genus Nycticorax), also called the American Night Heron or squawk, is a fairly small heron, similar in appearance to the Black-crowned Night Heron. It is found throughout a large part of the Americas, especially (but not exclusively) in warmer coastal regions. Sayulita is a small fishing village about 25 miles north of downtown Puerto Vallarta in the state of Nayarit, Mexico, with a population of approximately 4,000. Known for its consistent river mouth surf break, roving surfers "discovered" Sayulita in the late 60's with the construction of Mexican Highway 200. In recent years, it has become increasingly popular as a holiday and vacation destination, especially with surfing enthusiasts and American and Canadian tourists. (Photo by Marc Piscotty / © 2009)

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Sayulita
SHOT 1/18/10 5:56:14 PM - A yellow-crowned night heron hunts for food along the shore in Sayulita, Mexico. The Yellow-crowned Night Heron (Nyctanassa violacea, formerly placed in the genus Nycticorax), also called the American Night Heron or squawk, is a fairly small heron, similar in appearance to the Black-crowned Night Heron. It is found throughout a large part of the Americas, especially (but not exclusively) in warmer coastal regions. Sayulita is a small fishing village about 25 miles north of downtown Puerto Vallarta in the state of Nayarit, Mexico, with a population of approximately 4,000. Known for its consistent river mouth surf break, roving surfers "discovered" Sayulita in the late 60's with the construction of Mexican Highway 200. In recent years, it has become increasingly popular as a holiday and vacation destination, especially with surfing enthusiasts and American and Canadian tourists. (Photo by Marc Piscotty / © 2009)